UX Designer, Story Teller, and Phantasmagorical Creature of the Night
parsnipcover-1.jpg

Parsnip

 

Parsnip - Giving Brands the Power to Connect

This is a 3 week design sprint that we did for a client, Parsnip.

We hypothesized that if we created a if we create a more coherent and quantifiable on-boarding form for brands, then Parsnip will be able to provide brands with more meaningful potential brand matches,because the fidelity of the information brands submit will allow for smarter and more efficient matching.

 
parsnip title page.jpg
 

Who is Parsnip?

Parsnip is an automated B2B partnering service who has connected 700+ matches between by hand. The founders are inmate with their business, they conduct interviews and match companies behind the scenes based upon how they feel one business would work with another they have already interviewed. Parsnip has found that this process is not at all scalable and is far too subject to bias and took any choice for the user

 

Project overview

Duration:

3 weeks

Our team:

Aysha Bial

Julian Kwan

My role:

The team worked together as UX designers throughout the entire process including the research, research synthesis, problem definition, solution statement, and designs.

I lead the visual design of the project and made key design decisions on the low fidelity and high fidelity prototypes, but worked together with my team for consistent feedback and group design decisions.

Tools:

  • Google Sheets

  • Sketch

Methods:

  • Business analysis

  • Competitive analysis

  • UI comparative analysis

  • Market research

  • User interviews

  • Persona development

  • Journey mapping

  • Design studio

  • Wireframing

  • Prototyping

  • Usability testing

 

The problem

Our users don’t have a part in who they match with.

The current problem facing Parsnip is that their users are not involved in the matching process, all matches are made by the owners behind the scenes. Matching is a black box that doesn't involve users at all. The company is having is having to manually matching these brands based on qualitative data they collect during their on-boarding form, which is a 8 question form after registering an account. This process is inefficient, non-scalable for the two owners, and does not help brands match on their own.

 

 

Our Solution

Provide an quantitatively based, efficient and meaningful registration experience

“The goal is to get you to the best first date and then it’s up to you what to do.” The term meaningful here describes a mutually beneficial relationship through which brands are able to reach their primary goal. By making this form more quantifiable, we believe it will enhance Parsnip’s scalability. Because as the company grows, the infrastructure can grow with it.

 

Design process

This is the iterative design process that I subscribe to and utilize

double diamond.jpg

Discovery

Designing a B2B partnership service for brands

as.png

83.8% of clients are brands

Through survey data we found that 83.8% of users are brands. Brands are defined here as companies that sell a product. We chose to focus our design on the largest demographic of our clients customers, brands.

 

How and why are connections made?

We conducted an extensive series of user interviews in addition to mapping the information Parsnip has already collected on their clients who are brands. We then synthesized our findings to discover that the primary needs of our users are to find products that are complimentary to their own, an increased exposure to a broader audience as many of the brands Parsnip works with are start ups and brands want to work with people that have a similar mission and company values to their own: many of the food brands place a high value on the organizational as well as product certifications their partners hold.

 
  1. Complimentary products

    “We want something that goes well with my cracker.”


2. Increased exposure

“We check their amount of Instagram followers.”


3. Similar mission and company values

“We clicked because we were both female-founded brands”


isometric all screens parsnip.jpg
 

Usability testing and design

Parsnip’s current on-boarding form

Parsnip currently has users go through an initial registration and on-boarding process that makes users submit their brand’s email, create a password, and answer 8 required questions needed in order to start matching.

Current onboarding.jpg
 

Identifying the pain points in finding a brand partner

Through our research we found that the primary touch points users were having a hard time with were the ambiguity of some of the registration questions and the lack of control they had as users in finding out who they were being partnered with or who was even available as a partner. Some of this is a result of the company being in it’s early stages so we decided to focus our efforts primarily upon the language and interactions involved in the registration/on-boarding form.

 
Desktop HD.png

Current pain points

Current form usability test results:

  • Not friendly (lack of human touch)

  • Overwhelming and intimidating because of huge text response space

  • Information overload because of one long form

With these things in mind, we wanted to make our new questions:

  • conversational

  • grouped and separated into multiple parts

 
 

 

Low fidelity wire frames

We began with a brief design studio and moved to low fidelity wire frames. We wanted each question to be pertinent as well as relatable. Keeping the pagination from the original on boarding page to keep the process from being overwhelming. We wanted to fix the confusion around the progress bar so we made it clear what step the user is on and we also recognized the confusion around the wording of many questions so we rewrote many of them based upon our users needs and offered examples as well.

lofi screens 1.jpg
lofi screens 2.jpg
 

 

Second round of low fidelity wire frames

In our first iteration we did not design based on heuristics and our testing showed that our design was confusing and hard to access. And even though I was fairly invested in our design, in our second iteration we used bast proven practices in our design and the testing reflected a far better result. Instead of an overload of information that is difficult to scan, users were able to go through the list quickly and find all of the options that applied to their brand.

lofi 1.jpg
lofi 2.jpg
 

Principle design decisions

Giving people the feedback they need to give us the information we want

I thought a lot about all of the possible interactions a user could have with each question we asked in our registration process and if any error is made, we make provide helpful corrective action or recommendations and when fields are filled correctly we affirm the user that they are doing a good job.

giving users feedback they need.jpg
 

High fidelity wireframs

nameweb.jpg
socials.jpg
orgcerts.jpg
brandsdiffer.jpg
what make certs.jpg
typesinterested1.jpg
whatoffer.jpg
 
parsnip first page.jpg
 

Key iterations

Using available technology to connect socials

Using available socials to connect social media accounts save people time and the effort of typing. This also goes along with best practices for form and UI design.

socials itterations.jpg

Choosing multiple options from a list

In our first iteration we did not design based on heuristics and our testing showed that our design was confusing and hard to access. And even though I was fairly invested in our design, in our second iteration we used bast proven practices in our design and the testing reflected a far better result. Instead of an overload of information that is difficult to scan, users were able to go through the list quickly and find all of the options that applied to their brand.

multiple choice itterations.jpg
 

 

Conclusion

People hate forms.

However, we can help alleviate their pain by making a form less like a form. The way we do this is to create an experience that acts more like a conversation than an annoying questionnaire.

Diving deep into how to write simply, I learned to write out questions understood by the general user.

In addition to creating content, the number of questions in a form also plays a large role in user experience. Nobody enjoys filling out forms so making sure that the user has the least amount of questions to answer is a way to bring a painless experience. This is why we spent so much time trying to find out the top prioritized traits that brands use to base successful matches with— to know the bare minimum responses needed to create matches.

Form design best practices and heuristics pulled from Nielsen Norman group taught me a lot about creating good forms in general. Using these heuristics, we’re able to make a form thats consistent with all the other forms out there in the world so our users don’t get an unpleasant surprise.

Small things such as a progress bar to give users an idea of how long the process will take and errors messages to tell what the user did wrong helps the have a pleasurable experience when doing something so painstaking.